Blog

1 month ago

Beyond Concussion
Although many love the season of Autumn, with changing leaves and cooler temperatures, the season can also be a trigger for SAD, or Seasonal Affective Disorder (seasonal depression). If you notice drastic shifts in your mood during certain times of the year, you are not alone. SAD may cause sadness, anxiety, weight gain, fatigue, trouble concentrating, and loss of interest in activites. There is no known cause of seasonal depression, but a lack of sunlight may trigger the condition. SAD is not the “winter blues,” though it is not unusual to experience temporary feelings of sadness, tiredness, or stress during the cooler months; SAD is more serious. So… what to do. Talking to your provider about how you are feeling is the best way to find effective treatment. Light therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, spending time outdoors, and even vitamin D supplements may improve symptoms. my.clevelandclinic.orghttps://my.clevelandclinic.org › healthSeasonal Depression (Seasonal Affective Disorder) - Cleveland ClinicThe New York Timeshttps://www.nytimes.com › explainSeasonal Depression: SAD Causes and How to Manage ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Beyond Concussion
The 10 October is known the World over as World Mental Health Day – the result of a global advocacy and awareness program started by the World Federation for Mental Health in 1992.Each year on 10 October, thousands of individuals and groups will gather to celebrate and promote the only global day for mental health awareness. This annual program was created as a way to bring more attention to mental illness and its effects on individual life, work, family and overall stability of communities and countries. We all agree that one of the most important aspects of a ‘good life’ is our overall health. A meaningful definition of health as a ‘healthy state of well‐being’ should address the whole person, ‘the general condition of the body and mind’. Studies show that physical and mental well‐being have a major impact on one another – cancer, diabetes, chronic pain, cardiovascular or respiratory disease should not be viewed in isolation from the possible mental and emotional issues of an individual.Retrieved from: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2939461/ ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Beyond Concussion
Your brain’s storage capacity is considered virtually unlimited!!Research suggests the human brain consists of about 86 billion neurons. Each neuron forms connections to other neurons, which could add up to 1 quadrillion (1,000 trillion) connections. Over time, these neurons can combine, increasing storage capacity. However, in Alzheimer’s disease, for example, many neurons can become damaged and stop working, particularly affecting memory.Retrieved from: www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-happens-brain-alzheimers-disease ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Beyond Concussion
Stop and take a breath. Deep breathing can help reboot our bodies and minds. Take these steps when you feel you need a break, or need to center yourself throughout the day. From a Harvard University article: Find a quiet, comfortable place to sit or lie down. First, take a normal breath. Then try a deep breath: Breathe in slowly through your nose, allowing your chest and lower belly to rise as you fill your lungs. Let your abdomen expand fully. Now breathe out slowly through your mouth (or your nose, if that feels more natural).www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/relaxation-techniques-breath-control-helps-quell-errant-stre... ... See MoreSee Less
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3 months ago

Beyond Concussion
Hi everyone! Apologies on the late notice; we are unable to host tomorrow evening’s peer support group. Zoom notifications will be sent out shortly.Please join us next month for our September session instead ... See MoreSee Less
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